Bathroom

  • Most water consumption inside the home occurs in the bathroom.
  • Check regularly for any leaks in your toilet, faucets and water hose bibs and fix them.
  • Install a low-flow shower head.
  • Replace older, larger-use toilets with the newer higher efficiency toilets.
  • Take short showers and save the baths for special occasions.

Kitchen

  • Don’t rinse dishes before loading dishwasher.
  • Wash only full loads in the dishwasher. An efficient dishwasher usually uses much less water than washing dishes by hand.
  • Install a low-flow faucet aerator, which can cut water use in half.
  • When buying a new dishwasher, consider purchasing a water-saving model. (New models use up to 25 percent less water than older ones.)

Around the house

  • Wash only full loads of clothes in the washing machine. Washing small loads uses over twice as much water per pound of laundry.
  • When buying a new washing machine, consider purchasing a water-saving model.
  • Insulate hot water pipes where possible to avoid long delays (and wasted water) while waiting for the water to “run hot.” When building a new home, keep the distance short between the hot water heater and showers and other places that hot water is used.

Electricity

  • Turn off home computers and televisions when not in use
  • Minimize the amount of time refrigerator and freezer doors are open
  • Replace incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent bulbs where lights are on a lot of the time
  • Turn the lights off when you leave the room
  • Limit the use of small appliances during the day – especially heat producing appliances
    (coffee makers, electric fryers, hairdryers, curling irons, etc.)
  • Put timers on your dehumidifier or air purifiers so they run only at night
  • Close shades and curtains during the day to keep the heat out.
  • Turn of fans, rather than the air conditioners.
  • Turn the air conditioner off when you are not at home.